HKIAS Senior Fellow Professor David Srolovitz appointed as Head of Department of Materials Science and Engineering at City University of Hong Kong
HKIAS Senior Fellow Professor David Srolovitz appointed as Head of Department of Materials Science and Engineering at City University of Hong Kong
HKIAS News · 17 Jan 2020
Professor David Srolovitz, Senior Fellow of Hong Kong Institute for Advanced Study, was appointed as Head of Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) at City University of Hong Kong (CityU). Professor Srolovitz is currently Chair Professor of Materials Science in MSE.

Professor Srolovitz is the author of 500 papers on topics in materials theory and simulations ranging from defects (surfaces, grain boundaries, dislocations, point defects), microstructure evolution (grain growth, dislocations, stress effects, phase transformations), deformation (nanomaterials, dislocation motion, creep), and film growth (sputtering, evaporation, CVD) and has an h-index of 92 with more than 30,000 literature citations. He is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, Fellow of MRS, TMS, ASM, Institute of Physics and is the winner of the MRS Materials Theory Award. Srolovitz did his undergraduate work in Physics at Rutgers University and PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. He was a staff member at Exxon Corporate Research and Los Alamos National Laboratory early in his career and then was professor at the University of Michigan (Materials Science and Applied Physics), Princeton University (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics), and the University of Pennsylvania (Materials Science, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational Science). He also served as the Executive Director of the Institute of High Performance Computing and the Scientific Director of the Science and Engineering Research Council in Singapore.


Disclose the secret of 3D atomic dynamics with high space / time resolution TEM
Disclose the secret of 3D atomic dynamics with high space / time resolution TEM
HKIAS News · 16 Jan 2020
On 15 January 2020, Professor Fu-Rong Chen, Chair Professor in Department of Materials Science and Engineering at City University of Hong Kong (CityU), delivered a presentation titled “Disclose the secret of 3D atomic dynamics with high space / time resolution TEM” for Hong Kong Institute for Advanced Study at CityU.

Over the past decade, electron microscopy has become indispensable for scientists to interpret their findings on nano-materials at the atomic-scale. In the talk, Professor Chen explained the principle and optical structure of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). He pointed out the major limitation of TEM – radiation damage and elaborated by examples on electron beam effect in structural materials and functional materials.

Professor Chen introduced the world’s first-ever state-of-the-art Time-Resolved Aberration Corrected Environmental (TRACE) TEM, which is going to be set up at the High Space / Time Resolved In-situ TEM (HiSTRI) Laboratory of CityU.
According to Professor Chen, this unique TEM equipped with a special electron gun and a low dose sensitive camera which could effectively minimize electron radiation damage on nano-materials surface and able to record high space / time resolved dynamics of the observing object.

Furthermore, Professor Chen shared the recent development of interaction-free measurement in light optics to electron optics. He also discussed how to achieve the concept of “Quantum Seeing in the Dark” in the quantum electron microscope.

The talk was well received by various professors, scholars, graduate students and post-doctoral researchers at CityU. All participants were inspired by the development progress of TEM and discussed vigorously with the speaker.

Professor Chen received his bachelor degree in Electronic Engineering at National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan in 1980; he obtained his PhD in Materials Science at Stony Brook University, USA in 1986. His research interests are in low dose 3D atomic resolution electron tomography, soft materials dynamics imaging, quantum electron microscopy and solar energy tunable (SET) glass.